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some facts you many want to know

root canal

Root canal treatment is the removal of the tooth’s pulp, a small, thread-like tissue in the center of the tooth, sealing off the root canal.

dental bridges +

A bridge, also known as a fixed removable denture, is made to replace one or more missing teeth. Bridges can be supported by natural teeth or implants.

 

dental implants +

Implants are devices that replace the roots of missing teeth. They are used to support crowns, bridges or dentures and are surgically placed in your jawbone.

dentures +

Dentures are natural looking and comfortable replacements for missing teeth that can easily be taken out and put back into your mouth.

dental veneers +

These are thin shells of porcelain that are bonded to the front of the teeth, providing a natural, attractive look. They are used to fix chipped, stained or worn down teeth.

dental crowns +

A crown is a tooth-shaped cover placed over a tooth that is badly damaged or decayed. A crown is made to look like your tooth. Many people call it a cap.

dental extractions

Teeth are extracted for a variety of reasons including deep decay, significant infection or to make room for all the teeth in your mouth.

 

mercury fillings

A mercury filling is a silver/grey filling that is usually placed in the molar and premolar teeth. It consists of a mixture of different metals including mercury, silver, tin and copper.

dental whitening

Tooth whitening lightens teeth and removes stains and discoloration. It is among the most popular cosmetic dental procedures because it can greatly improve how your teeth look.

dental composite bonding

Composite Bonding is the application of a tooth-coloured composite resin to repair a decayed, chipped, fractured or discoloured tooth.

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dentalcomposite bonding +

what is dental composite bonding?

Composite Bonding is the application of a tooth-coloured composite resin to repair a decayed, chipped, fractured or discoloured tooth. Unlike veneers, which are manufactured in a laboratory and require a customized mould to achieve a proper fit, composite bonding can be done in a single visit. The procedure is called composite bonding because the composite material bonds to the tooth.


what is it used for?

Composite bonding is among the easiest and least expensive of cosmetic dental procedures. The composite resin used in bonding can be shaped and polished to match the surrounding teeth. Most often, composite bonding is used for cosmetic purposes to improve the appearance of a discoloured or chipped tooth. It also can be used to close spaces between teeth, to make teeth look longer or to change the colour of teeth.

Sometimes, composite bonding also is used as a cosmetic alternative to amalgam fillings, or to protect a portion of the tooth’s root that's exposed when gums recede.

Preparation is needed for bonding. Anaesthesia often is not necessary, unless the bonding is being used to fill a decayed tooth.



how it’s done

Your dentist will use a shade guide to select the composite resin colour that will match the colour of the tooth most closely.

Once your dentist has chosen the colour, he will slightly abrade or etch the surface of the tooth to roughen it. The tooth will be coated lightly with a conditioning liquid, which helps the bonding material adhere.

When the tooth is prepared, your dentist will apply the tooth-coloured, putty-like resin. The resin is moulded and smoothed until it’s the proper shape. Then the material is hardened with an ultraviolet light or laser.

After the bonding material hardens, your dentist will further trim and shape it. Then he will polish the material until it matches the sheen of the rest of the tooth surface.

It usually takes about 30 minutes to an hour to complete the procedure. If you’re having more than one tooth done, you may need to schedule several visits.



risks

The composite resin used in bonding isn’t nearly as strong as a natural tooth. Biting your fingernails or chewing on ice or pens can chip the material. Bonding usually lasts several years before it needs to be repaired. How long it actually lasts depends on how much bonding was done and your oral habits.


when to call a professional

In the days after having the bonding done, call your dentist if you notice sharp edges on the bonded teeth, or your teeth feel strange or “off” when you bite down.

At any time, call your dentist if the bonding chips or pieces fall out.